Author: Sue
•12:42 PM
So I went to the government site on mosquitoes and here are their tips for mosquitoe control.
What you can do to control mosquitoes around the home
  • Remove their habitat (where they live and breed)
  • Eliminate standing water in rain gutters, old tires, buckets, plastic covers, toys, or any other container where mosquitoes can breed.Empty and change the water in bird baths, fountains, wading pools, rain barrels, and potted plant trays at least once a week to destroy potential mosquito habitats.
  • Drain or fill temporary pools of water with dirt.
  • Keep swimming pool water treated and circulating. 
  • Prevent your exposure to mosquitoes
  • Use EPA-registered mosquito repellents when necessary and follow label directions and precautions closely.
  • Use head nets, long sleeves and long pants if you venture into areas with high mosquito populations, such as salt marshes.
  • If there is a mosquito-borne disease warning in effect, stay inside during the evening when mosquitoes are active.
  • Make sure window and door screens are "bug tight."
  • Replace your outdoor lights with yellow "bug" lights which tend to attract less mosquitoes than ordinary lights. The yellow lights are NOT repellents, however.

This information was found at:
http://www.epa.gov/opp00001/health/mosquitoes/mosquito.htm

  1. Web MD had a fascinating article on why mosquitoes will be attracted 
    to some people over others.
    It can be found at:
    http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/are-you-mosquito-magnet

    Scientists do know that genetics account for a whopping 85% of our susceptibility to mosquito bites. They've also identified certain elements of our body chemistry that,
     when found in excess on the skin's surface, make mosquitoes swarm closer.

    "People with high concentrations of steroids or cholesterol on their skin surface attract mosquitoes," Butler tells WebMD. That doesn't necessarily mean that mosquitoes prey 

    on people with higher overall levels of cholesterol, Butler explains. These people simply may be more efficient at processing cholesterol, the byproducts of which remain on the skin's surface.

    Mosquitoes also target people who produce excess amounts of certain acids, such 

    as uric acid, explains entomologist John Edman, PhD, spokesman for the Entomological Society of America. These substances can trigger mosquitoes' sense of smell, luring them to land on unsuspecting victims.

    But the process of attraction begins long before the landing. Mosquitoes can smell their dinner from an impressive distance of up to 50 meters, explains Edman. This doesn't bode well for people who emit large quantities of carbon dioxide.

    "Any type of carbon dioxide is attractive, even over a long distance," Conlon says. Larger people tend to give off more carbon dioxide, which is why mosquitoes typically prefer munching on adults to small children. Pregnant women are also at increased risk, as they produce a greater-than-normal amount of exhaled carbon dioxide. Movement and heat also attract mosquitoes.

    So if you want to avoid an onslaught of mosquito bites at your next outdoor gathering, stake out a chaise lounge rather than a spot on the volleyball team. Here's why. As you run around the volleyball court, the mosquitoes sense your movement and head toward you. When you pant from exertion, the smell of carbon dioxide from your heavy breathing draws them closer. So does the lactic acid pouring from your sweat glands. And then -- gotcha.

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1 comments:

On November 20, 2013 at 7:33 AM , Jeffrey Goude said...

Hi, Sue. How’s your gardening? Have you considered growing mosquito-repelling plants in your garden? They may help you battle those garden woes that’s stressing you out. If that doesn’t work, then perhaps you should consider an environment-friendly extermination service. Jeffrey @ BugManiacs